David Berry
Chemistry, University of Victoria

David is an enthusiastic and extremely effective contributor who volunteers much of his spare time to make the most opportunities to educate and enthuse students. As a Laboratory Supervisor in the Department of Chemistry, he is responsible for all aspects of laboratory teaching of inorganic chemistry including overall administration of the undergraduate laboratory program and the hiring and training of all teaching assistants. In 1997, he received the University’s highest recognition – the Alumni Award for Teaching Excellence.

Dave gives his time, generously and energetically, to the activities of the Learning and Teaching Centre, He is a willing consultant, advisor,[...]

David is an enthusiastic and extremely effective contributor who volunteers much of his spare time to make the most opportunities to educate and enthuse students. As a Laboratory Supervisor in the Department of Chemistry, he is responsible for all aspects of laboratory teaching of inorganic chemistry including overall administration of the undergraduate laboratory program and the hiring and training of all teaching assistants. In 1997, he received the University’s highest recognition – the Alumni Award for Teaching Excellence.

Dave gives his time, generously and energetically, to the activities of the Learning and Teaching Centre, He is a willing consultant, advisor, and presenter at teaching and learning events as well as a member of the Advisory Committee to the Centre. He works tirelessly to promote the campus-wide program for graduate teaching assistants were he served on the planning group, chaired the sessions for international teaching assistants, and recruited workshop facilitators. He is a stalwart advocate for fairness in employment practices and the necessity for the institution, and departments, to provide timely and appropriate training for all graduate students who teach. As part of a Graduate Studies initiative, he has voluntarily taken on the role of organizing a formal program “Graduate Students as Apprentice Teachers” – a program in which peers will teach peers in an effort to improve undergraduate teaching.

Dave also chaired discussion sessions on the practical problems of teaching, contributing to the recent volumes of the Critical Teaching Incidents videotapes which cover such topics as plagiarism, discrimination and harassment. These tapes have raised the profile of teaching around campus and are widely used as a resource for training at many universities throughout the world. David has received several Innovative Teaching Grants, including one to develop his own video entitled, “Critical Safety Incidents”, a videotape that graphically translates the lessons learned from a fire in the Chemistry department into lab safety training resource.

He maintains an active academic research program in inorganic chemistry through collaborations with faculty at the University of Victoria and with laboratories at other universities. He has also been invited to present at a number of National and International conferences and has published widely in a variety of scientific journals.

Francis Chan
Anatomy of Cell Biology, University of Western Ontario

Francis is known to countless medical students as an inspiring teacher and a caring and compassionate mentor. He has a unique ability to stimulate and challenge his students in a manner that is both entertaining and instructive. He does a tremendous amount of background preparation for the courses he teaches, and uses all possible avenues, including art and poetry, to draw connections between different ideas. As a result, his student ratings have been consistently in the “excellent” range since 1980. The high standards that he sets in the classroom and his overall contributions to educate have been recognized by the[...]

Francis is known to countless medical students as an inspiring teacher and a caring and compassionate mentor. He has a unique ability to stimulate and challenge his students in a manner that is both entertaining and instructive. He does a tremendous amount of background preparation for the courses he teaches, and uses all possible avenues, including art and poetry, to draw connections between different ideas. As a result, his student ratings have been consistently in the “excellent” range since 1980. The high standards that he sets in the classroom and his overall contributions to educate have been recognized by the medical students who have awarded him the Hippocratic Council Basic Science Teaching Award on six occasions. In 1999, his outstanding contributions to medical education were recognized by the Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry who presented him with the Dean’s Award of Excellence in Teaching. In 1996, he was awarded the University of Western Ontario’s highest award in teaching, the Edward G. Pleva Award.

Francis’ interests in teaching and education extend into a whole range of activities for which he is recognized at the local, provincial and national levels. He is one of the founding and continuing members of the annual 2-day faculty development workshop on “Learning How to Teach”. He is both a peer consultant and a frequent speaker at workshops sponsored by the Educational Development Office. He is interested in the training of teaching assistants from other cultures and speaks annually on this topic at the “Orientation Day for International Teaching Assistants”. Francis has also played a unique role in education as the University’s first Program Officer, International/Exchange Student Affairs where he dedicated his time to improving the quality of students’ experiences by making the campus more welcoming to international students and assisting Canadian students in participating actively in educational opportunities around the world.

His extensive work on various committees, many in leadership roles, has been instrumental in the introduction of the new medical curriculum at Western. His contribution and hard work at the “grass roots” level facilitated the transition tot he new “patient-centered” model. He also plays an active role in devising the new curriculum through hi membership on four different subject development groups.

Diana Cooper-Clark
English, York University

Diana Cooper Clark’s pedagogical initiatives and passion for teaching and learning span 31 years. She is a superb, energetic teacher who lectures with style and verve. She is humorous and confident and inspires students to challenge themselves to achieve. Diana has taught over 150 courses in English and Humanities in both Faculty of Arts and Atkinson College, as well as in the Centre for Academic Writing. Her courses included large lectures, seminars, and even one-on one tutoring. The Career Days she initiated for students in the English Department have been a great success in highlighting for students and faculty the[...]

Diana Cooper Clark’s pedagogical initiatives and passion for teaching and learning span 31 years. She is a superb, energetic teacher who lectures with style and verve. She is humorous and confident and inspires students to challenge themselves to achieve. Diana has taught over 150 courses in English and Humanities in both Faculty of Arts and Atkinson College, as well as in the Centre for Academic Writing. Her courses included large lectures, seminars, and even one-on one tutoring. The Career Days she initiated for students in the English Department have been a great success in highlighting for students and faculty the importance of the study of English. She has won several teaching awards including the Humanities Teaching Award, the York University-Wide Teaching Award for Contract Faculty, and the CASE Canadian Professor of the Year Award.

As Chair of the English Department at Atkinson College, she has revised the curriculum, assisted in its transformation into the School of Arts and Letters, has initiated a major student/faculty exchange between York and the University of Cassino, Italy, and is leading faculty in the development of distance and Internet teaching. She is devoted to junior, contract faculty and teaching assistants and offers on-going assistance and mentoring by offering practical, intellectual, and emotional support. She generously shares her knowledge and experience and routinely makes herself available for consultation.

Diana has also worked for the Centre for Support Teaching. She has served on the Centre’s Advisory Board, assisted with the Centre’s Panel on the Teaching Professional, served on the selection committee for Graduate Teaching Associates, and has been a consultant for the Centre in several capacities. She was a member of the Teaching Committee in the Division of Humanities from 1992, and Chaired the Committee in 1993-1994. She provides countless workshops and seminars on undergraduate teaching for York’s Colleges, and offers assistance to many of her colleagues, advising them on pedagogical and professional issues alike. Outside the University, she works with the Toronto and North York Boards of Education, lectures and provides direction for community reading groups affiliated with the National Council of Jewish Women, and has influenced pedagogy across the United States and Canada, as well as abroad. She has published two books and a range of articles. She is a frequent presenter at conferences, has given a number of invited lectures, and offers workshops to colleagues.

Aaron Devor
Sociology, University of Victoria

Aaron’s excellence in teaching is documented by the exceptional student evaluations he consistently receives. He has taught nine different courses, five of which were entirely new courses which he developed. He teaches courses in statistics, gender, sexuality, and feminist theory and for every course, all students have rated his performance highly. His student ratings have been among the highest in the Department of Sociology for over ten years. He is a highly respected scholar and teacher, and in 1995, was the recipient of the University of Victoria Alumni Association Award for Excellence in Teaching. Student testimonials note his meticulous preparation,[...]

Aaron’s excellence in teaching is documented by the exceptional student evaluations he consistently receives. He has taught nine different courses, five of which were entirely new courses which he developed. He teaches courses in statistics, gender, sexuality, and feminist theory and for every course, all students have rated his performance highly. His student ratings have been among the highest in the Department of Sociology for over ten years. He is a highly respected scholar and teacher, and in 1995, was the recipient of the University of Victoria Alumni Association Award for Excellence in Teaching. Student testimonials note his meticulous preparation, his expectation of high effort, his challenge to think critically, his humane advocacy, his generous gift of extra time to interested students, and his commitment to helping every learner develop. Aaron’s achievement as a publishing research scholar is also impressive both in its quantity and widening influence. In addition to having served on the University Senate, he has also served on a host of other departmental and university committees related to teaching and curriculum development. He gives numerous guest lectures in both graduate and undergraduate courses on campus.

Aaron has a long association with the activities of the Learning and Teaching Centre at the University of Victoria. He has been a member of their Advocacy Committee, a workshop presenter, a participant in panel discussions and a guest speaker on a variety of topics pertaining to improving teaching. He demonstrates an ongoing commitment to TA training development through his involvement in workshops and other training opportunities, both as Acting Associate Dean of Graduate Studies and now as Dean of the Faculty.

As a recipient of an Innovative Teaching Grant, he devised the WebForum, a new software program for the classroom that allows instructors to set up and monitor on-line discussion groups and post unlimited course materials using the Internet or e-mail, thereby aiding student confidence and participation levels. He is a strong spokesperson for the value of teaching at the University of Victoria and has a wide and positive impact on the value that his colleagues attach to learning.

Barry Joe
German, Centre for Digital Humanities, Brock University

As the Director for the Centre for Teaching, Learning and Educational Technologies, Barry Joe fosters an inviting atmosphere for professional development at Brock University. Some of his accomplishments include reviving the New Faculty Orientation program, establishing an awards program for junior and senior teaching assistants, managing and marketing an internal computer-based training software system for faculty, staff and students, and overseeing the implementation of recommendations for teaching and learning in the University’s Planning and Priorities document. His interest in computer-mediated learning environments has given a strong technological direction to the Centre which benefits colleagues across the disciplines. Under Barry’s leadership,[...]

As the Director for the Centre for Teaching, Learning and Educational Technologies, Barry Joe fosters an inviting atmosphere for professional development at Brock University. Some of his accomplishments include reviving the New Faculty Orientation program, establishing an awards program for junior and senior teaching assistants, managing and marketing an internal computer-based training software system for faculty, staff and students, and overseeing the implementation of recommendations for teaching and learning in the University’s Planning and Priorities document. His interest in computer-mediated learning environments has given a strong technological direction to the Centre which benefits colleagues across the disciplines. Under Barry’s leadership, the Centre has become the hub for efforts to effectively introduce technology as an aid to learning. The Centre offers workshops on WebCT to help faculty use this learning platform. This year, Barry was host and Conference Co-Chair for the annual conference of the Society for Teaching and Learning in Higher Education – perhaps the most significant event for teaching and learning held at Brock since its founding.

Barry maintains consistently high student ratings in two different disciplines in two different Faculties. Most of his recent course development work involved conceptualizing, designing and executing a series of courses at the core of the Information Technology stream in Communication Studies. This careful development effort and his enthusiasm for these courses is all the more remarkable, given that he teaches the courses on overload. Barry regularly presents the results of his curriculum development at conferences across Canada. His dedication to teaching and learning, both institutionally and at the personal level, earned him the recognition of his peers when he was named recipient of the Brock University Award for Distinguished Teaching in 1999.

Allan Jones
Medical Oncology, University of Calgary

Allan’s teaching is much recognized and praised at the University of Calgary. He is ranked at or near the top for his teaching performance in the clinical setting and in the lecture theatre by a large number of students. He is approachable, thoughtful and thorough in all of his dealings with students and is a clinical role model and mentor for many of them. His strength in the classroom is his ability to help students organize information better, by providing a framework for more efficient retention and retrieval of knowledge. The methods he developed and uses in the course that[...]

Allan’s teaching is much recognized and praised at the University of Calgary. He is ranked at or near the top for his teaching performance in the clinical setting and in the lecture theatre by a large number of students. He is approachable, thoughtful and thorough in all of his dealings with students and is a clinical role model and mentor for many of them. His strength in the classroom is his ability to help students organize information better, by providing a framework for more efficient retention and retrieval of knowledge. The methods he developed and uses in the course that he chairs have now been adopted by many others in the School.

By working collaboratively with the student body, he helped to develop a student code of professional conduct, a peer tutor “study buddy” program, a career counseling program, and a formative examination system. He is a regular recipient of teaching awards within the Faculty of Medicine, and he consistently receives letters of teaching excellence in the Internal Medicine Residence Programme. The undergraduate class recognized his teaching achievements by awarding him a gold star for excellence on a yearly basis since 1987.

Allan also provides educational leadership for colleagues in the Department of Medicine. He chaired the Blood System Course from 1989 to 1996 making it the top-rated course in the first two years of a three-year curriculum. Besides being Director of the Clerkship Programme, he was the Assistant Dean of Undergraduate Medical Education from 1992 until 1996 and is currently the Associate Dean. Allan helped establish the first three national conferences on faculty development for the Association of Canadian Medical Colleges. At the national level, he has endeavored to improve the assessment systems used by the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons and has run training workshops for its examiners. Other educational projects include development of outcome based objectives for the graduating medical students at the University of Calgary, development of Faculty of Medicine guidelines for tenure and promotion based on educational achievements, and an external review of the Zamboanga Medical School in the Philippines.

Don Kline
Psychology, University of Calgary

Don Kline is clearly a remarkable classroom instructor who cares about his students and who constantly develops new materials and methods to facilitate their learning.. Paperless exams, a lab in which students use their knowledge to solve a “clinical vision mystery”, and interactive web tutorials are just a few of the innovations Don has helped pioneer at the University. Don also developed eight original labs for his Vision course and with a colleague is creating an html-based modular learning package called Sight & Sound for use in perception, audition and vision courses. He is widely recognized for his innovations in[...]

Don Kline is clearly a remarkable classroom instructor who cares about his students and who constantly develops new materials and methods to facilitate their learning.. Paperless exams, a lab in which students use their knowledge to solve a “clinical vision mystery”, and interactive web tutorials are just a few of the innovations Don has helped pioneer at the University. Don also developed eight original labs for his Vision course and with a colleague is creating an html-based modular learning package called Sight & Sound for use in perception, audition and vision courses. He is widely recognized for his innovations in curriculum design, the creative use of technology in course and program delivery and for his contributions to the development of a “universal” teaching evaluation instrument and an associate “publication” system for the campus-wide dissemination of course evaluation data for student use in course selection. Don’s key role in developing the USRI instrument and publication process won him the Students’ Union Ray Alward Memorial Service Award. He has also received the Madden Teaching award, Faculty of Social Sciences Distinguished Teacher Award, the Student’s Union Teaching Excellence Award, and the President’s Circle Award for Teaching Excellence.

Don contributes regularly and with distinction to the broader institutional pursuit of teaching excellence and curriculum development. He established and participated in the design of a Psychology Learning Resource Centre and created the University’s first position of Teaching Coordinator to help faculty members respond to the needs and pressures of very high department enrolments. Beyond his own department, he contributes to the advancement of the gerontology curriculum and training across the province as the University’s representative to the Alberta Gerontology Consortium. He participates in numerous symposia, workshops and presentation, and helped develop the University’s new curriculum model as a member of the Undergraduate Curriculum Redesign Team. His work on this Team was exceptional and recognized by a Presidential Citation for Excellence in Service.

Roger Moore
Romance Languages, St. Thomas University

Roger Moore is an outstanding teacher and leader in teaching and learning development both at St. Thomas University and in the Atlantic Region. While teaching in the smallest department at one of Canada’s smallest universities, Roger brings relentless energy and creativity and works continuously to introduce new offerings to strengthen the Spanish curriculum, including live theatre, novel on-line applications, and an innovative conversation course that helps students become more fluent in Spanish while bridging the gap between existing courses in grammar and in composition. He loves innovation, ideas, students, and he loves to teach. He maintains an open door philosophy[...]

Roger Moore is an outstanding teacher and leader in teaching and learning development both at St. Thomas University and in the Atlantic Region. While teaching in the smallest department at one of Canada’s smallest universities, Roger brings relentless energy and creativity and works continuously to introduce new offerings to strengthen the Spanish curriculum, including live theatre, novel on-line applications, and an innovative conversation course that helps students become more fluent in Spanish while bridging the gap between existing courses in grammar and in composition. He loves innovation, ideas, students, and he loves to teach. He maintains an open door philosophy and encourages students to visit his office when they need help. His overall student ratings scores are substantially above the university average every year and he has won two major teaching awards. In 1996, he was the first-ever winner of the St. Thomas University Excellence in Teaching Award, the University’s only teaching prize. He also received the Association of Atlantic Universities Distinguished Teaching Award, a regional award with some 3,000 eligible faculty members.

Roger is currently Chair of the Learning and Teaching Development Committee. The Committee organizes activities such as “teaching conversations”, Effective Teaching Institutes, and this year, developed an in-house publication on teaching entitled, Teaching Perspectives. Roger has led a number of workshops on teaching and learning over the years on various topics related to good teaching. His most important contribution in his five-university tour in 1999 at which he led a workshop entitled, “LOTUS: Learning Options for Tomorrow’s University Students”. He was also invited by colleagues in the graduate faculty of education at the University of New Brunswick to help them with the development of academic and exchange programming with UABJO in Oaxaca, Mexico, and has since become deeply involved in a number of projects involving three-way collaboration with St. Thomas University, the University of New Brunswick, and UABJO. Roger has a strong record with respect to publications on teaching and was co-editor of the Proceedings of the 4th Atlantic Association of Universities Teaching Showcase.

Morris Orzech
Mathematics and Statistics, Queen’s University

Morris is a dedicated teacher who works tirelessly to improve the quality of education for his students and to promote effective teaching among his colleagues. He has led curriculum development efforts in his own department and was among the first at Queen’s to use “incomplete notes” for a large first-year linear algebra course, a technique which keeps students involved while freeing them from making copious notes. These interactive notes play a key role in creating independent learners and promoting deep learning. He was also one of the first to introduce a computer-based bulletin board called “MathChat” to promote discussion of[...]

Morris is a dedicated teacher who works tirelessly to improve the quality of education for his students and to promote effective teaching among his colleagues. He has led curriculum development efforts in his own department and was among the first at Queen’s to use “incomplete notes” for a large first-year linear algebra course, a technique which keeps students involved while freeing them from making copious notes. These interactive notes play a key role in creating independent learners and promoting deep learning. He was also one of the first to introduce a computer-based bulletin board called “MathChat” to promote discussion of mathematical issues dealt with in class among students, teaching assistants and instructors. This pioneering use of the Internet is now used in over 80 different courses at Queen’s. He works closely with the Learning Technology Unit, serving on its advisory Board and presenting sessions on incorporating technology into the classroom. He has given presentations at the annual Technology Education Day and acts as an invaluable resource person and instructor for courses and seminars offered by the Instructional Development Centre. He is a member of Queen’s Cross-Faculty Teaching Forum, a planning group university-wide events on teaching.

In 1995, he crated the Mathematics and Statistics Teaching and Learning Seminar series which regularly brings together highly motivated teachers from the Department, the Faculty of Education, the Instructional Development Centre, and occasionally visitors from other universities and local high schools. He has been a leader at Queen’s as well as nationally with respect to a wide variety of educational issues in mathematics. Morris has chaired the Canadian Mathematical Society’s Education Committee, a national body for promoting and studying the teaching in mathematics in post-secondary institutions. Over the years, Morris has given numerous talks and workshops about aspects of the teaching of mathematics within the department, in the university and at meetings of the Canadian Mathematical Society and the Mathematical Association of America. He has published two papers in peer-reviewed educational journals, one in PRIMUS, and the other in the International Journal of Academic Development.

Deborah Schnitzer
University of Winnepeg
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