Lauren Chan
Medicine, Queen's University

Lauren was one of the first ten students to be accepted to the Queen’s Accelerated Route to Medical School program in 2013. She is passionate about advocating for marginalized populations in her community and challenging inequity. Lauren has spent many years in her community working with children who have disabilities and in palliative care. She is the coordinator of the Student Advancement Research Program at the Hospital for Sick Children, a research internship program designed to inspire under-represented students to learn more about career opportunities within healthcare and research.

Driven by the inequity she witnessed while volunteering in rural China,[...]

Lauren was one of the first ten students to be accepted to the Queen’s Accelerated Route to Medical School program in 2013. She is passionate about advocating for marginalized populations in her community and challenging inequity. Lauren has spent many years in her community working with children who have disabilities and in palliative care. She is the coordinator of the Student Advancement Research Program at the Hospital for Sick Children, a research internship program designed to inspire under-represented students to learn more about career opportunities within healthcare and research.

Driven by the inequity she witnessed while volunteering in rural China, she began to explore ways that health policy could improve people’s lives. Lauren was recently invited to the World Health Organization executive board meeting in Geneva, where she had the opportunity to advocate for the development of accessible research and development strategies. She hopes to incorporate research into her future medical career, and believes that this is one of the best ways to think creatively and make a meaningful contribution.

Trillium Chang
Global Health and Molecular Genetics, University of Toronto

As the Co-Director of the University of Toronto International Health Program, U of T’s largest student run charity, Trillium is firmly committed to the principles of social justice and human rights.

An aspiring clinician-scientist, Trillium holds a fervent interest in global health, with a focus on the social determinants of health and patient-centered care. As an American Association of Cancer Research undergraduate scholar, Trillium is especially interested in the intersection of cancer care with health policy. Trillium developed and conducted the first large-scale global study on parental coping to retinoblastoma, a pediatric cancer of the retina. Through the study, she[...]

As the Co-Director of the University of Toronto International Health Program, U of T’s largest student run charity, Trillium is firmly committed to the principles of social justice and human rights.

An aspiring clinician-scientist, Trillium holds a fervent interest in global health, with a focus on the social determinants of health and patient-centered care. As an American Association of Cancer Research undergraduate scholar, Trillium is especially interested in the intersection of cancer care with health policy. Trillium developed and conducted the first large-scale global study on parental coping to retinoblastoma, a pediatric cancer of the retina. Through the study, she hopes to identify resources and policies that can better assist parents to cope adaptively to their child’s diagnosis.

Trillium is also actively involved in undergraduate education at U of T. As the student advisor to the Public Health School’s board, she is committed to curate a curriculum that focuses on critical and creative thinking.

Through her leadership positions, Trillium is devoted to focusing her energy and heart to create a world where health is not merely an ideal, but an inalienable human right. Outside of the university, Trillium is an avid reader, traveller, and marathoner.

Elyse Cottrell
Psychology & Diversity and Social Justice Studies, University of Prince Edward Island

I am pursuing a double major in Psychology, and Diversity and Social Justice Studies at the University of Prince Edward Island. In university I found a way to express my passion for social justice; and building a close-knit community on campus that recognizes social justice issues is central to my leadership role at UPEI. Helping to create and run the Campus Life Program, which is devoted to creating an inclusive environment on campus allows me to work towards that goal. I believe it is important to reduce stigma, and I am currently a co-chair for the UPEI Rainbow Alliance, which[...]

I am pursuing a double major in Psychology, and Diversity and Social Justice Studies at the University of Prince Edward Island. In university I found a way to express my passion for social justice; and building a close-knit community on campus that recognizes social justice issues is central to my leadership role at UPEI. Helping to create and run the Campus Life Program, which is devoted to creating an inclusive environment on campus allows me to work towards that goal. I believe it is important to reduce stigma, and I am currently a co-chair for the UPEI Rainbow Alliance, which promotes gender and sexuality inclusion and rights, and I am open about my own experience with multiple sclerosis. This past year I started the Community Kitchen, seeking to reduce food insecurity on campus. I want to help others enjoy their university experience, and create a better society. Currently I am working on my Honours research project looking at opinions on reproductive rights across Canada, and I plan on pursuing a PhD in Social Psychology where I will continue my work examining the effects that stereotypes, discrimination, and prejudice have on society.

Paul Kim
Biochemistry, University of Victoria

Paul believes in utilizing passion and education to drive change. As a biochemistry major at the University of Victoria, he is passionate about science and medicine. He has worked at the Centre for Microbial Diseases and Immunity Research and BC Cancer Agency Deeley Research Centre to characterize novel therapeutics for multidrug-resistant infections and identify prognostic metabolic markers in cancer.

As a young boy, Paul overheard a conversation about barriers to education in third world countries which sparked his passion for philanthropy. In his youth, he instigated a program to send textbooks to disadvantaged schools in Zimbabwe. By working with Students[...]

Paul believes in utilizing passion and education to drive change. As a biochemistry major at the University of Victoria, he is passionate about science and medicine. He has worked at the Centre for Microbial Diseases and Immunity Research and BC Cancer Agency Deeley Research Centre to characterize novel therapeutics for multidrug-resistant infections and identify prognostic metabolic markers in cancer.

As a young boy, Paul overheard a conversation about barriers to education in third world countries which sparked his passion for philanthropy. In his youth, he instigated a program to send textbooks to disadvantaged schools in Zimbabwe. By working with Students Offering Support, he has been able to help students on campus while supporting educational infrastructure development in impoverished Latin American communities.

Paul is a leader who seeks solutions to problems in today’s world. When he noticed inefficiencies in the functioning of charities across Canada, he worked with colleagues to devise a new model of giving: one that leverages the power of regular individuals who want to make extraordinary change by bringing the power of market investing into the charitable sphere. This has culminated in a non-profit organization named GivGro which aims to redefine sustainable giving.

Nia King
Biomedical Sciences, University of Guelph

Nia believes that leadership is a compilation of attributes that allows one to identify every individual’s potential and that fuels a desire to facilitate opportunities that allow others to pursue their passions. Nia is passionate about working with individuals with exceptionalities to break the barriers preventing their integration into society; she therefore dedicates much of her time to volunteering with Big Brothers Big Sisters and various rehabilitation programs. While conducting research in Kenya, Nia’s relentless desire to facilitate growth opportunities fueled her to collaborate with local schoolgirls to establish a reusable menstrual napkin program that would help mitigate absenteeism and[...]

Nia believes that leadership is a compilation of attributes that allows one to identify every individual’s potential and that fuels a desire to facilitate opportunities that allow others to pursue their passions. Nia is passionate about working with individuals with exceptionalities to break the barriers preventing their integration into society; she therefore dedicates much of her time to volunteering with Big Brothers Big Sisters and various rehabilitation programs. While conducting research in Kenya, Nia’s relentless desire to facilitate growth opportunities fueled her to collaborate with local schoolgirls to establish a reusable menstrual napkin program that would help mitigate absenteeism and dropouts among this population.

Athletics have also always dominated Nia’s schedule. She has represented Canada on the international rowing stage, Ontario at the Canada Winter Games, and was recently selected as one of five youth who will run six consecutive marathons across Death Valley National Park.

All in all, whether volunteering, coaching, competing, working as a tutor, or serving as the Primary Organizer of TEDxGuelphU, Nia strives to inspire those around her to catalyze change and collaborate to work towards a better tomorrow.

Timothy Lipp
General Management, Mount Royal University

Graduating at the top of your high school is a piece of cake—especially when you’re homeschooled. Eventually he got tired of sharing a room with three younger brothers. So he fled to Nepal and did sociolinguistic research. For two years Timothy worked to inform the language development of a minority ethnic community with over 300,000 speakers. He experienced first-hand how communities struggle with indoor air pollution, deforestation, and economic marginalization. This led him to study business at Mount Royal University and develop business skills applicable to community development work.

On a whim he and some other classmates competed in Calgary’s[...]

Graduating at the top of your high school is a piece of cake—especially when you’re homeschooled. Eventually he got tired of sharing a room with three younger brothers. So he fled to Nepal and did sociolinguistic research. For two years Timothy worked to inform the language development of a minority ethnic community with over 300,000 speakers. He experienced first-hand how communities struggle with indoor air pollution, deforestation, and economic marginalization. This led him to study business at Mount Royal University and develop business skills applicable to community development work.

On a whim he and some other classmates competed in Calgary’s Change Tank, and won first place with the idea of establishing businesses in developing countries that build high-efficiency stoves. “Project Stoke” works to reduce the 4.3 million deaths that happen each year because of cooking smoke inhalation. Timothy’s driving passion has become finding how innovation can interface with marginalized communities around the world. He is conducting research, gaining practical experience with Project Stoke, learning from members of Indigenous communities throughout southern Alberta, and taking too many awesome university courses.

Kevin Ng
Microbiology and Immunology, University of British Columbia

Kevin Ng is a 4th year Honours Microbiology and Immunology student at the University of British Columbia. Having started as a clinical researcher at age 15, he is passionate about exposing and engaging undergraduate students interested in research. He most recently implemented a travel grant to allow five of UBC’s top undergraduate researchers to attend the National Collegiate Research Conference at Harvard, as well as helping run a research mentorship program that currently involves 250 undergraduates across 9 faculties. During this time, Kevin has also been involved in the creation and maintenance of two national and international networks focused on[...]

Kevin Ng is a 4th year Honours Microbiology and Immunology student at the University of British Columbia. Having started as a clinical researcher at age 15, he is passionate about exposing and engaging undergraduate students interested in research. He most recently implemented a travel grant to allow five of UBC’s top undergraduate researchers to attend the National Collegiate Research Conference at Harvard, as well as helping run a research mentorship program that currently involves 250 undergraduates across 9 faculties. During this time, Kevin has also been involved in the creation and maintenance of two national and international networks focused on tangible ways to support undergraduate researchers across the continent. He is also co-chairing the Global Health Conference at UBC, aiming to stimulate cross-disciplinary discussions to generate new perspectives on global health.

Beyond his research-related pursuits, Kevin enjoys traveling, and recently completed an exchange semester at University College London, studying molecular virology and researching the political and economical sociology of HIV/AIDS. He will be returning to UCL this summer to study the role of cyclophilins in HIV infection and entry. In his spare time, Kevin plays the violin and viola and recently served as concertmaster of the National Youth Orchestra of Canada.

Michael Peters
Medicine, University of British Columbia

Michael’s story as a humanitarian begins with his grandmother becoming wheelchair-bound after an immobilizing stroke; she eventually passed away from a blood clot that resulted from her immobilization. Moved by this experience, Michael developed a wheelchair adaptation to potentially help prevent deep vein thrombosis in immobilized patients. Through his inspired work with disabled individuals, he brought his invention to the worldwide community by competition in national and international science innovation events. His international experiences gave him a newfound appreciation for the privileges we have in Canada, and he spent two summers in rural Ecuador building houses with an international organization.[...]

Michael’s story as a humanitarian begins with his grandmother becoming wheelchair-bound after an immobilizing stroke; she eventually passed away from a blood clot that resulted from her immobilization. Moved by this experience, Michael developed a wheelchair adaptation to potentially help prevent deep vein thrombosis in immobilized patients. Through his inspired work with disabled individuals, he brought his invention to the worldwide community by competition in national and international science innovation events. His international experiences gave him a newfound appreciation for the privileges we have in Canada, and he spent two summers in rural Ecuador building houses with an international organization. Without losing his community roots, Michael also focuses on community building and values-based support groups for children and junior youth. This Junior Youth Empowerment Program is an institution dedicated to developing powers of expression, capacities for moral reasoning, and an ethic of service to others by combing studying, mentorship, and social action. In addition, Michael’s mother passed away from cancer when he was 15, and this life-changing event instilled in him a desire to help others. He began cycling to raise money for cancer research, culminating in a trans-North America cycling journey. Michael is currently studying medicine at UBC.

Zondra “Pricelys” Roy
Education, University of Saskatchewan

Zoey “Pricelys” Roy is a Cree-Dene Metis spoken word poet, emcee, community activist, educator and student in SUNTEP at the University of Saskatchewan. At 15, Zoey knew that in order to rebel against the “at risk” association she carried, she needed to find success. She started volunteering for her school and community so she can heal, to gain access to networks and meld her role in them. She wrote poetry to make sense of her life.

She learned that other Indigenous students were deflecting from school and occupying foster care homes and beds in the judicial system more than other[...]

Zoey “Pricelys” Roy is a Cree-Dene Metis spoken word poet, emcee, community activist, educator and student in SUNTEP at the University of Saskatchewan. At 15, Zoey knew that in order to rebel against the “at risk” association she carried, she needed to find success. She started volunteering for her school and community so she can heal, to gain access to networks and meld her role in them. She wrote poetry to make sense of her life.

She learned that other Indigenous students were deflecting from school and occupying foster care homes and beds in the judicial system more than other Canadians. She knew it was not a coincidence so she began seeking answers. She found that education that is responsive to holistic needs of youth is necessary for building a generation of Indigenous youth who are keen on learning and participating in society. This is when she pursued her education degree.

Zoey has discovered that identity is the biggest challenge youth face and she has become passionate about facilitating ways for people to express their most authentic self with hopes of truly celebrating community.

Dammee Sero
Human Rights & Human Diversity, Wilfrid Laurier University

Dammee Sero came to Brantford, Ontario in 2012 through the World University Service of Canada, Student Refugee Program (WUSC/SRP) to study and resettle in Canada. Dammee is a passionate poet, Oromo activist, and a transformational leader. She aspires to build a foundation that will empower refugee women, girls and other disadvantaged groups to get an education.

Before coming to Canada, Dammee spent a decade in the Kakuma refugee camp in northwestern Kenya with her family. Last year, her family was resettled in England by the UN High Commission for Refugees. For Dammee, education is the key to empowerment and change.[...]

Dammee Sero came to Brantford, Ontario in 2012 through the World University Service of Canada, Student Refugee Program (WUSC/SRP) to study and resettle in Canada. Dammee is a passionate poet, Oromo activist, and a transformational leader. She aspires to build a foundation that will empower refugee women, girls and other disadvantaged groups to get an education.

Before coming to Canada, Dammee spent a decade in the Kakuma refugee camp in northwestern Kenya with her family. Last year, her family was resettled in England by the UN High Commission for Refugees. For Dammee, education is the key to empowerment and change. While in Kakuma, she taught girl child education for a year and mobilized parents to send their girls to school. Wilfrid Laurier University has welcomed Dammee and opened up a world of opportunities. In summer 2015 Dammee participated in a human rights field course in Mexico, where she worked with Central American migrants transiting through the country on freight trains. This summer she will complete a 90-day internship at a human rights organization in Ghana. Dammee is very active in the campus branches of WUSC and the human rights student association. She hopes to enter law school after completing her BA.

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